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The Hunley Comes Out of Her Shell
 
01:26
The Hunley has finally come out of her shell. For the first time in over a century, you can actually see the original surface of the world’s first successful combat submarine. Using small hand tools, drills, and chisels, conservators have removed approximately 1200 pounds of concretion, roughly the same weight as a grand piano. This material is being removed so the submarine can be preserved for generations to come. With the exterior now completely exposed, they will start to chisel away the concretion covering the inside of the crew compartment. Actually being able to see the submarine is opening up an entire new avenue of study for archaeologists working to solve one of the 19th century’s greatest maritime mysteries: why did the Hunley vanish after sinking the USS Housatonic in 1864? Now they are attempting to read what the submarine’s original surface has to tell them. They have already uncovered holes, scratches, damage, and other curious items that will require further research to understand their significance to the submarine’s story. At this point, perhaps the most notable “forensic hot spot”— indicating a potentially evidence-rich area on the submarine – is what has been uncovered in the area of the Hunley’s weapon delivery system. Damage has been found in the area on the bow where it was mounted that may have been caused by collision or impact. As archaeologists investigate the new clues uncovered by the deconcretion, conservators will take their work into the crew compartment, hopefully uncovering more artifacts and other clues to help solve the mystery of the Hunley’s disappearance.
Views: 75935 FriendsoftheHunley
True Surface of the Hunley Revealed
 
01:16
No one alive today has actually seen the original surface of the world's first successful combat submarine because the H. L. Hunley is completely covered by an encrusted layer of sand, sediment and shells that built up gradually over time around the vessel. But beginning in August 2014, the true surface of the Hunley will slowly be revealed as Clemson University scientists kick off a year-long effort to remove the brittle concretion masking the legendary submarine and some of her finer features.
Views: 5358 FriendsoftheHunley
Hunley Submarine Rotation Animation
 
02:58
Hidden Side of the Hunley Will Soon be Revealed WWW.HUNLEY.ORG The H. L. Hunley -- the world's first sucessful combat submarine -- has rested on her side at a 45 degree angle in exactly the same position she was found on the ocean floor after being lost at sea for well over a century. Soon, the Hunley will be carefully rotated to an upright position, achieving a major milestone for the Project. When the vessel's historic position is rotated next year it will give the world an opportunity to see a portion of the submarine that has been hidden for generations. Since August 8th, 2000, the Hunley has remained cradled in the sling system that lifted her from the ocean. The slings have completely masked an entire part of the submarine. When the rotation project is completed, the submarine's right side will be revealed, providing a new perspective on the Hunley not seen since 1864. The truss currently holding the submarine will also be removed, giving visitors a much better view of the Hunley during weekend public tours.
Views: 19529 FriendsoftheHunley
Keel Blocks Offer Evidence to Hunley Mystery
 
01:35
According to the scientists studying the submarine, the crew did not operate the emergency keel release mechanisms the night they lost their lives in the experimental, 40-foot vessel. The blocks represent a significant breakthrough in conservation as well as an important clue for those working to solve the mystery of the Hunley’s disappearance. In 1864, the Hunley became the world’s first successful combat submarine with the sinking of the USS Housatonic. Historical records indicate the submarine’s crew signaled to shore they were on the way back home but instead they vanished without a trace. The reason surrounding the Hunley’s loss has remained an intriguing maritime mystery for over a century. Many theories have circulated over the years to explain the final moments that resulted in the death of her eight-man crew. A popular theory is the Hunley got stuck on the sea bed, unable to rise. Cranking the submarine over 4 miles to their target would have been physically exhausting to the crew. To ease the stress, they planned their approach with the outgoing tide. It is possible they waited on the bottom of the ocean floor for the tides to turn so they could use the current to help get back home. If they somehow got stuck, they likely would have attempted to drop some of the heaviest keel blocks to help rise back up to begin the journey back to land. However, the blocks were found fastened in place, meaning they did not attempt to use this emergency function. For some reason, the crew did not think it would help or were unable to start this emergency procedure.
Views: 5969 FriendsoftheHunley
The Hunley Moves Upright for First Time in Over a Century
 
01:31
The Hunley may not be ready to set sail again, but after today, she almost looks like she could. Scientists finished their work of carefully rotating the Hunley to an upright position, completing a major milestone in the effort to save the world's first successful combat submarine. And it was a moment 147 years in the making. The Hunley has rested on her side at a 45-degree angle since the she was lost in 1864. The submarine was lifted from the ocean floor in that exact same position in 2000 and has remained on her side, until today. The historic shift in her delineation has left the Hunley upright on her keel as she was originally designed to be and in position to undergo her final mission: a complete preservation treatment. Next, scientists will remove the straps and overhead truss that have held the Hunley since her recovery, exposing a new side of the vessel that has not been fully seen since the crew entered it over a century ago. This won't be done for a few weeks, however, so scientists can have the additional support of the slings available while they ensure the submarine is completely stable in the new position. Hunley Commission Chairman Senator Glenn McConnell said he is eager to have access to this new area of the submarine, hoping new clues may be uncovered that will provide insight into the mystery of the crew's demise. "This is tremendous day for the project. Not only will the public soon have an unobstructed view, we will too. We may the find the crucial evidence we've been searching for in this newly exposed area" McConnell said. The Hunley is a fragile 19th century artifact, making safely moving the approximate 7-ton, 40-foot submarine a challenging engineering feat and risky endeavor. The team spent two years planning the rotation and tested various simulations in advance on a 3D model. The process to rotate the sub was at times slow and tedious and others nerve-racking. The painstaking project took days, with scientists rotating the submarine mere millimeters at a time. After each incremental move, a series of computer monitors were checked to ensure even weight distribution with no major stresses on the submarine. Two technical issues added hours, and a little tension, to the project. At one point, the bow started to dip too much toward the ground and scientists had to make modifications to get the submarine level again. They had anticipated the potential of this occurring though had hoped it would not affect the rotation. Also, a laser monitoring system -- critical to detecting any potential warping or damage that scientists were desperately trying to avoid -- had to be adjusted one morning, causing a delay of a few hours for rotation work to start. "It's fair to say we are all breathing a collective sigh of relief now that the rotation is over. The laser never strayed more than a millimeter out of its target. Aside from minor technical issues, the rotation went according to plan with the sub remaining completely safe and intact," Mike Drews, Director of Clemson University's Warren Lasch Conservation Center, said. This project would not have been possible without the generous support and expertise of J. A. King & Co., Parker Rigging, Inc., Detyens Shipyard and the entire Hunley team who worked tirelessly in support of this effort.
Views: 46915 FriendsoftheHunley
World’s First Successful Combat Submarine Almost Fully Visible
 
01:14
For the first time in over 150 years, you can actually see the Hunley. Until recently, the submarine was completely covered by concretion, an encrusted layer of sand, sediment and shells that built up slowly over time. The concretion masked the original surface of the legendary vessel, hiding many of her finer features. For the past four months, Clemson University conservators have been conducting the delicate task of chiseling away this encrustation. Nearly 70% of the submarine’s exterior has been revealed and they hope to complete the outside of the submarine in the coming weeks. The last areas remaining are being called “forensic hot spots,” indicating areas where they think there may be evidence that could help scientists understand why the Hunley vanished after becoming the world’s first successful combat submarine.
Views: 33521 FriendsoftheHunley
H. L. Hunley Uncovered
 
01:45
VIDEO OF HUNLEY BEING COMPLETELY EXPOSED FOR FIRST TIME SINCE 1864 WWW.HUNLEY.ORG Seeing the Hunley has never been easy. For over a century, the submarine was hidden by the depths of the sea. Since the Hunley was recovered in 2000, she has been obscured by a steel truss mega-structure that was used to lift her from the ocean. On Jan.12th, 2012, that changed, meaking the Hunley completely visible for the first time since 1864. The 50-foot, 17,000-pound truss that has long been a view-blocking appendage sitting on top of the Hunley was carefully removed by experts in what was at times a delicate procedure. Though necessary for the Hunley's safety, the truss has also completely obstructed a full viewing of the submarine until now. Enhancing the visitor experience is only one of the benefits of big move. "Separating the truss from the Hunley represents the official beginning of the final conservation treatment of the Hunley," said Mike Drews, Director of Clemson's Warren Lasch Conservation Center, home to the legendary submarine and other significant pieces of American history. Next, modifications will begin on the Hunley's 90,000-gallon conservation tank. The tank -- which currently holds chilled fresh water to stabilize the submarine as she awaits treatment -- needs to be altered in order to accommodate the chemicals necessary for conservation. Scientists hope to have the submarine soaking in the chemical bath by the end of this year. The solution is designed to slowly leach out the salts that infiltrated the Hunley's iron during her 136-year stay on the ocean floor. Those salts are toxic to iron and threaten the very survival of the world's first successful combat's submarine. After several months of soaking in the solution, the layer of concreted sand, shell, and silt that encases the Hunley will be carefully removed, allowing for a faster pace of conservation. Though it is no longer needed to support the Hunley, the steel truss will continue to have a role in the Project. It will be stored and used in the future museum display of the Hunley. "The large steel structure was an integral part of the cutting edge technological achievement in the Hunley's recovery. It will be preserved and placed in the planned Hunley Museum to tell future generations about the technology that encompassed every aspect of the Hunley story from the submarine itself, to its recovery, and to its conservation and preservation," said Senator Glenn McConnell, Chairman of the Hunley Commission.
Views: 15688 FriendsoftheHunley
Saving Hunley Artifacts:  The Wallet
 
01:00
This is the first in an ongoing series exploring the artifacts found within the H. L. Hunley’s crew compartment, which was in essence a 19th century time capsule. The wallet featured in this video is a very fragile Civil War artifact comprised of two pieces, one nested inside the other. The outer shell of the wallet is a bit more weathered than the inner piece. The wallet is now in remarkable condition after an in-depth preservation process. Clemson University Conservators used a freeze drying method to remove water and damaging salt crystals from the leather. The wallet is stored in a temperature and humidity-controlled environment in preparation for museum display at a future date. The original owner is unknown and is just one of the many secrets surrounding the Hunley and her voyage through history. Learn more about Friends of the Hunley at www.HUNLEY.org Follow us on Facebook for the latest updates: https://www.facebook.com/HunleyProject/ Subscribe to this Channel! Music by: https://www.free-stock-music.com/
Views: 337 FriendsoftheHunley
The Recovery of the H. L. Hunley
 
01:01
Though the Hunley’s journey began over a century ago, her modern-day voyage of scientific discovery began on August 8th, 2000 when she was gently lifted from her ocean grave. This video that details how the recovery of the Hunley was accomplished with no damage to this unique maritime treasure. The Hunley was delivered to the Warren Lasch Conservation Center for study, excavation and preservation. Since then, scientists working to save the legendary submarine have made fascinating discoveries and are inching closer to discovering what led to the Hunley and her crew’s loss. The Hunley has always been shrouded in mystery. In 1864, she became the world’s first successful combat submarine, but then she vanished. For over a century, treasure hunters and history buffs searched in vain for the submarine. In 1995, an expedition led by Clive Cussler’s National Underwater Maritime Agency (NUMA) finally located the lost submarine and her eight-man crew. Bringing the Hunley back to land was a major engineering feat. Then, after recovery, the Hunley’s scientific team faced the challenges of excavation and conservation. Since then, the Project has compiled a long list of accomplishments and technological advancements. Learn more at www.HUNLEY.org.
Views: 1323 FriendsoftheHunley
The Hunley Uncovered (Long Version)
 
06:16
VIDEO OF HUNLEY BEING COMPLETELY EXPOSED FOR FIRST TIME SINCE 1864 WWW.HUNLEY.ORG Seeing the Hunley has never been easy. For over a century, the submarine was hidden by the depths of the sea. Since the Hunley was recovered in 2000, she has been obscured by a steel truss mega-structure that was used to lift her from the ocean. On Jan.12th, 2012, that changed, meaking the Hunley completely visible for the first time since 1864. The 50-foot, 17,000-pound truss that has long been a view-blocking appendage sitting on top of the Hunley was carefully removed by experts in what was at times a delicate procedure. Though necessary for the Hunley's safety, the truss has also completely obstructed a full viewing of the submarine until now. Enhancing the visitor experience is only one of the benefits of big move. "Separating the truss from the Hunley represents the official beginning of the final conservation treatment of the Hunley," said Mike Drews, Director of Clemson's Warren Lasch Conservation Center, home to the legendary submarine and other significant pieces of American history. Next, modifications will begin on the Hunley's 90,000-gallon conservation tank. The tank -- which currently holds chilled fresh water to stabilize the submarine as she awaits treatment -- needs to be altered in order to accommodate the chemicals necessary for conservation. Scientists hope to have the submarine soaking in the chemical bath by the end of this year. The solution is designed to slowly leach out the salts that infiltrated the Hunley's iron during her 136-year stay on the ocean floor. Those salts are toxic to iron and threaten the very survival of the world's first successful combat's submarine. After several months of soaking in the solution, the layer of concreted sand, shell, and silt that encases the Hunley will be carefully removed, allowing for a faster pace of conservation. Though it is no longer needed to support the Hunley, the steel truss will continue to have a role in the Project. It will be stored and used in the future museum display of the Hunley. "The large steel structure was an integral part of the cutting edge technological achievement in the Hunley's recovery. It will be preserved and placed in the planned Hunley Museum to tell future generations about the technology that encompassed every aspect of the Hunley story from the submarine itself, to its recovery, and to its conservation and preservation," said Senator Glenn McConnell, Chairman of the Hunley Commission.
Views: 15961 FriendsoftheHunley
LiftingHunleyVideo.wmv
 
02:24
The world's first successful combat submarine was gently raised again on June 15th, 2011, but this time by only a few feet. In a nerve-racking moment for the Hunley team, the estimated ten-ton, forty-foot submarine was suspended into mid-air in her conservation tank. The raising kicked-off the project to move the Hunley to an upright position, a dangerous yet necessary step to save the submarine. The rotation will expose a side of the Hunley that has not been seen by anyone since her last crew boarded the vessel in 1864. Archaeologists are eager for the opportunity to study this new area, which may hold clues as to why the Hunley was lost.
Views: 2853 FriendsoftheHunley
Hunley Slings Dropped
 
00:32
Scientists preparing for the rotation of the Hunley, which will reveal a new side of the submarine that hasn't been seen since the 19th century. This video, shot Monday, June 20th, shows scientists removing a sling. They have to remove approximately half of the slings that have cradled the Hunley since August 8th, 2000, the historic day she was lifted from the ocean floor. For more information, visit www.hunley.org.
Views: 3999 FriendsoftheHunley
Hunley Deconcretion
 
01:13
No one alive today has actually seen the original surface of the world's first successful combat submarine because the H. L. Hunley is completely covered by an encrusted layer of sand, sediment and shells that built up gradually over time around the vessel. But beginning in August 2014, the true surface of the Hunley will slowly be revealed as Clemson University scientists kick off a year-long effort to remove the brittle concretion masking the legendary submarine and some of her finer features.
Views: 377 FriendsoftheHunley
Hunley Deconcretion
 
01:13
Hunley Deconcretion
Views: 107 FriendsoftheHunley

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